Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Art Tool Review: Edation Seamless Body

After last weeks catastrophe with the A9 I was a bit worried that this expensive Edation Seamless body was going to be a disappointment as well. But it turns out to be really great.

Articulation
The figure has over 38 points of articulation. The fingers and toes are wires and can be bent into any pose. Obviously this means the fingers and toes can often look a bit like noodles since they will bend where there are not in fact joints.Unlike many of the female figures out there, the neck is articulated and the torso can be twisted.

Anatomy
I think the proportions are pretty good on this figure. All of these figures are designed with putting clothes on them so the breasts are always made to be defying gravity as if they're bolted on. So it doesn't look so great without costume on but it's not often a client would have nudity in an illustration anyways. It's nice the the back of the knees and knees are well sculpted. There's an indication of should blades. The clavicle is cartoonish. There's a nice little bump to indicate the end of the ulna.

It's important to note that this figure doesn't come with a head. I took the head off of my Triad Eve (which was terrible) and put it on this figure and it fit fine.

I do kind of prefer sculpted hands as they are much more realistic but I may be able to find more interesting and inspiring hand poses with the options available with the wire fingers.

People have a really strange mindset on how to portray the female form so I'm not sure if it's a limitation of the silicone or an artistic choice but I'm about to have a mini rant. There are soooo many people out there that want to draw and sculpt women like they don't have any bones. They're all soft and gentle forms and they're filled with flowers and gingerbread. Well they're not. They're made of blood,bones,muscle and fat like us men and they're not any less attractive for not being filled with flowers. You gotta put in the sacrum where muscle and fat don't dwell and it breaks up the round forms. How can a sculpt gloss over the iliac crest on a woman?! If you can do that little bump for the ulna then you can put in that precious bump where the tensor fasciae latae and sartorious originate and the external oblique seems to rest on top of. If you can have a fucking belly button and slit for the vagina then you could have had a plane change for the blade of the shin and SOME kind of indication of what's truly going on with the top of the foot. Rant over. Again this might be a limitation of the silicone rather than a sculpting choice.

Posing
This was the big concern people had online. Since you can't see the joint setups, it's hard to know if you're twisting and turning things correctly. This puts you at risk of breaking the figure. The instructions try to explain how to pose the figure but do a terrible job and the english translation is probably leaving a lot out. A quick search of the net turned up a page saying that when moving the shoulder and hip joints to apply pressure to the joint as you move it. This seems to do the trick or at least mine doesn't seem to have broken while I was putting it in a variety of poses.

It's difficult to do extreme poses(arms above head) and the silicon can begin to fold, ruining any illusion of realism.

I failed to realize on these poses but it would definitely be best to start posing from the extremities and work your way in.

The instructions also say not to leave it in an extreme pose or the silicone could get resistant to further posing.  So basically return it to it's shipping pose when done.

Materials
The material is a silicone like what's used for prosthetic so it is squishy. It almost feels slimy. As such it seems to attract every little piece of lint and hair that's nearby. So I'll be keeping it in a zip lock baggy whenever it's not in use.

Conclusion
It's a great figure although not perfect. It makes me really excited about what we might see down the line. The ideal set up would be a skeleton underneath that in places is just barely covered by the encasing material and the encase material is attached or anchored to those spots. That way raising the arms high doesn't create creases and you can have a better sense of the hard vs soft forms.
Here are some quick poses with it. In the first one you can see where I couldn't bend the arm any further back to meet her head.You can also see where the slight torso twist makes the breasts go all funky.



2 comments:

Michael Prescott said...

Fascinating stuff.

On the subject of poseable models, I've been curious whether a really good-quality hand model could be made, with elastics for tendons, and fixed-volume pouches (filled with something honey-like) for muscles. Properly jointed bones.

Joe Slucher said...

Michael-You would know more about how to put something like that together than me. I don't know if anybody would though since I don't know where the profit would be since most people just take photos of their own hands.